Cronkites War: His World War II Letters Home

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Cronkites War: His World War II Letters Home file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Cronkites War: His World War II Letters Home book. Happy reading Cronkites War: His World War II Letters Home Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Cronkites War: His World War II Letters Home at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Cronkites War: His World War II Letters Home Pocket Guide.

Articles

  1. Free PDF Cronkite's War : His World War II Letters Home Download
  2. Refine your editions:
  3. Walter Cronkite's World War II letters collected in book

Mar 21, Cindy rated it really liked it. Excellent view of WWII. If one does not study history, one is doomed to relive it God bless our uniformed defenders - living and passed. Wonderful set of letters telling of a man's love of wife and his experiences in the European theater of World War II. These love letters tell of life and loss in war. Shelves: wwii , biography , library , audio , I started this book as a hardcover I happened to see in the library. So I read the first pp in one format. Then I borrowed the audio copy and listened to it today on my phone actually mostly in the car now that I have a car that will broadcast from my phone.

Made the miles fly by today on my drive home from North Carolina.

Free PDF Cronkite's War : His World War II Letters Home Download

Actually some of it I re-read since I couldn't really remember where I left off. Basically this book is made up of letters written by Walter Cronkite, UP reporter in Eng I started this book as a hardcover I happened to see in the library. I love all the references to Judy, their cocker spaniel. I am hlad I saw the hardcover of this book in that it showed what a cutey that Judy really was. Betsy looked all right, too. Half of the time Cronkite is trying to get his wife over to England to join him. Then he started trying to get home leave to come home to see her and was told he was too valuable.

He rode in bombers, gliders, etc. Many did but Cronkite was stuck back at the desk coordinating the reports. Feeling sorry for himself because he was left out of the action. And, of course, this is just what he told his wife. The book does at times compare what he says here with what he later said in A Reporter's Life which were not necessarily exactly the same thing.

The editors here, one of whom is Walter's grandson, go with the letters for thry were written at the time things were happening, not years later with the benefit of hindsight. I found some of these letters very beautiful. As you read the letters the young Walter wrote to his beloved Betsy, you see his brave front in perilous places , and his careful recounting of moments he had to know were historic in order that the woman who shared his life could share these times with him.

I love this historical period, and read and study everything I can about it. That aside, I grew up watching Walter Cronkite bring honest journalism into my world, and now I am reading about the world that formed the man himself. It is heady stuff, and I recommend this book heartily. Oct 26, Pauline rated it really liked it. This was the story of a man who was born mature. It was pretty interesting although the letters were repetitive. Walter's grandson was the book's narrator.

Walter had a strong romantic side. Apr 12, Andrew rated it really liked it Shelves: amazon-vine. This collection of letters he wrote home to his wife provide an intimate look into this important early period of his career. Of course, since these are the letters of a husband separated from the wife he loves, they are first and foremost love letters.


  1. Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home by Walter Cronkite IV;
  2. Keeping the Feast: One Couples Story of Love, Food, and Healing in Italy.
  3. Projective geometry and point transformations!
  4. Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home by Walter Cronkite IV;
  5. The Blood-Brain Barrier and Its Microenvironment: Basic Physiology to Neurological Disease?
  6. Walter Cronkite WWII Letters in New Book, Most Trusted Man in America;

The letters portray Cronkite as a man who was very much in love with his wife and incredibly lonely for her presence. They are also a reminder of how much more difficult communications were during this period, when the letter was the only practical way to communicate with distant friends and family. Delivery delays and frequent writing meant that any conversation was somewhat jumbled and confused. These troubles were further compounded by the security requirements for censorship, which almost certainly caused writers to exercise a certain discretion in their letters.

But, as a journalist, Cronkite was also aware of the historical importance of the events he was covering, and perhaps even understood that his letters might someday be part of the historical record of the war. The details he provides about his work and his role in covering the war illuminate the conditions in England, especially London, during this period, as well as on the continent as the war drew to a close.

The editors of this book have included explanatory text for most of the letters, which help place the letters into context, which is incredibly helpful, and improves the value of the collection, as do the various transcripts of newspaper articles that Cronkite produced during this period. For those with an interest in journalism or the Second World War, this book provides valuable insights into both, while still being both readable and entertaining.

There are apparently a few instances where Cronkite's letters indicate that his later recollections, when he wrote of his experiences for his books, that he had suffered from the same ki This was a somewhat interesting compilation of letters from Walter Cronkite to, mostly, his wife over the course of his service with UP during WWII. There are apparently a few instances where Cronkite's letters indicate that his later recollections, when he wrote of his experiences for his books, that he had suffered from the same kinds of problems that later journalists think Brian Williams suffer in getting their facts right.

But there seems no good reasons from book to attempt removing Cronkite from his place as the most trusted journalist ever. One interesting tidbit was brought up in both the introduction and in the epilog, and that is that Cronkite went off to college as a young man, but did not finish. In light of what political hay current journalists are making regarding some running for political office, who also did not finish their courses of study, I thought this a bit of irony. If you wish to learn of WWII, this is not the right place to look - only in a very limited way is there as sense of the scope of the war.

One small vignette of Cronkite turning down an invitation to join replacements headed for Bastogne reveals that, while he was often ready to follow the combat, as time wore on he had gained a certain amount of wisdom as to his own mortality. Oct 23, D rated it really liked it. Loved the personal letters and insight into the life of the most respected newsman of the Century. Darlingest Betsy I worship you, darling. Please know that I miss you every minute and am terribly lonely for you.

Forever and ever, your adoring husband, Walter It seems so long -- much longer than just a year -- since I ran my fin Loved the personal letters and insight into the life of the most respected newsman of the Century. Forever and ever, your adoring husband, Walter It seems so long -- much longer than just a year -- since I ran my fingers through your hair, and felt you close to me. It has been a century since I heard that giggle that everyone loves and I adore. I could relive every moment with you ten thousand times and never grow tired of them.

It was always on a one-on-one basis. Dec 28, Jeni Enjaian rated it liked it Shelves: history , read-in , wwii-and-holocaust. Once again I bemoan the fact that goodreads does not offer the option of half stars in the rating. This book definitely earned more than an average rating, however, a few things kept me from giving it a four star rating.

As an amateur historian, I absolutely love getting to read and experience primary documents. One of the things I appreciated most from Cronkite IV's narration was his explanation of the discrepancies between his grandfather's memoirs and the letters. In his preview to one of the Once again I bemoan the fact that goodreads does not offer the option of half stars in the rating. In his preview to one of the letters, Cronkite IV explained the reason most historians prefer primary source documents to remembered histories such as memoirs or autobiographies.

I cannot remember Cronkite IV's exact words but I do remember going "yes! That being said, I think that the book suffered from far too much narration on the part of Cronkite IV.

I realize that none of Betsy's letters remain so the role of a narrator was necessary to keep the conversation from being too one sided and to fill in information not covered or referenced obscurely in the text. Cronkite IV added too much in many places which detracted from the letters themselves. This reason alone is why I could not give this book a four star rating. It came close but fell just shy.

This is an excellent book for those who cannot get enough of WWII history and of journalism in general. Aug 19, Liz Waters rated it really liked it. Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home does not disappoint in its glimpses into the private life of the broadcasting icon as he shared his experiences with the love of his life in letters home.

The book is written by Cronkite's grandson and namesake in collaboration with Maurice Isserman and is a study in respect and admiration, tinged by just a touch of envy -that envy that every historian feels for those who lived in the world we can only experience vicariously. As you read the letters t Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home does not disappoint in its glimpses into the private life of the broadcasting icon as he shared his experiences with the love of his life in letters home.

As you read the letters the young Walter wrote to his beloved Betsy, you see his brave front in perilous places, and can enjoy and admire his careful recounting of moments he had to know were historic in order that the woman who shared his life could share these times with him. That aside, I grew up, as many of us did, watching Walter Cronkite bring honest journalism into my world, and now I am reading about the world that formed the man himself.

Refine your editions:

Aug 19, Luke Johnson rated it really liked it. Sadly, it's a one side conversation as we have only the letter from Walter, and none of the letters written to him. It's a bit of an open diary as Cronkite moves from the U. To me, it paints a rather endearing portrait of the legendary newsman as his love and longing for his wife is evident throughout.

However, it's strengths are also it's weakness and the way in which every letter ends with him stating his loneliness without his wife and all to often and in equal measure, the family dog gets old very quick. I ended up feeling a little sorry for his wife who seems to be held in equal regard to their cocker spaniel. Still an enjoyable read with nice glimpses of history and humanity and we get the tale of WWII from a man who is neither entirely soldier or civilian. Oct 28, Melinda Crews Kirkley rated it it was amazing.

I loved reading his letters to Betsy. The love between them was deep, something that is hard to find these days. Even though they were separated for 28 months, they stayed true to each other. Yes, there were very scary times, but Walter never failed to write letters home to assure Betsy he was OK.

Also, his love for his little cocker spaniel, Judy was so sweet! He always made sure to include her in his letters. Walter Cronkite IV did a wonderful job explaining who each of the people were in the I loved reading his letters to Betsy. Walter Cronkite IV did a wonderful job explaining who each of the people were in the letters as well as describing the different situations that his grandfather wrote about. I thought this was a very well written book. I adore books written in letter form and was prepared to love this one, full of letters written from Walter Cronkite to his wife during WWII.

I wound up skimming the letters as so many were mundane accounts of clothing problems, drinks after work, housing woes That said, intimate profiles of political and military leaders, battles planned and carried out, and personal opinions of same would probably have been censo I adore books written in letter form and was prepared to love this one, full of letters written from Walter Cronkite to his wife during WWII. That said, intimate profiles of political and military leaders, battles planned and carried out, and personal opinions of same would probably have been censored out, so I was happy to glimpse what I could through the eyes of a newsman I listened to on the nightly news for years.

May 14, theGraveyard Librarian rated it it was ok. Fame and riches didn't come easily, though. Born in in Missouri, Cronkite worked at newspapers and radio stations in a quick series of places — including a brief period in Oklahoma City — before going to London in late to cover World War II for United Press.

see

Walter Cronkite's World War II letters collected in book

London was a dreary place in the '40s. Residents endured bombings, food and housing shortages and widespread destruction. Cronkite came to admire the people's courage and ability to endure with the proverbial stiff upper lip. Still, it was a hard slog, made all the worse because Cronkite felt lonely and homesick, missing his young bride, Betsy, back home in America. His letters to Betsy Cronkite comprise the bulk of the book, making it a love story set amid the tragedy of war.

Cronkite endured such cold in those London winters that his fingers would hardly hold a pencil or pen to write letters.


  1. Who Was Ulysses S. Grant?.
  2. Cronkite's War by Walter Cronkite, IV and Maurice Isserman | Penguin Random House Canada.
  3. Software Process Improvement and Management: Approaches and Tools for Practical Development;
  4. Walter Cronkite's WWII Letters Home in New Book.
  5. Cronkite's War: His World War II Letters Home!

Sometimes coal for a little heat could be had only through the black market.